Friday, September 28, 2012

To Wed the Fae Prince by V. Vervain

Etta Cooper has been promised to marry the Prince of the Faeries since before she was born. A move from her mundane life and family take her into the enchanted Faeryland where she is promised to the handsome Bronn, eldest prince of the Fae King, but when Bronn decides he doesn't want her she is betrothed to his elegant, introspective, and... sullen younger brother Farron. Farron is a human hater. Trapped in this lush, beautiful world of faery Etta longs to escape until she begins to spend time with Farron, and their conversations slowly chip away at the frosty, superior mask he wears. Perhaps, just perhaps Farron is exactly the challenge she's been looking for...


Vervain's short story novella (just around a 100 pages) has it's high points and it's lows.  Etta doesn't want her parents to suffer the consquences of an oath, so she finds herself thrust into a new world, that of faery.  She begins to like her new betrothed, but he tosses her aside.  She's already got her feelings hurt and to find out that now she is to marry the prince's younger brother, Farron, really irks her.

Farron is a cold man and Etta just knows he hates her.  But the more time they spend together, the more that Etta finds out just who Farron really is and maybe, he doesn't really hate her, but desires and wants her as his wife.

The characters are likable and the premise is promising.  I just wish Etta has been a more developed and mature character and I would have liked to have seen the world of faery described in more detail.  I love world-building and although what is described doesn't take from the story, it doesn't add to it either.  If you're looking for an enjoyable short story, with mature content, pick this one up!



*I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

1 comment:

  1. Oh, I love fae stories! Thanks for sharing this with us :)

    - Ellie @ The Selkie Reads Stories

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The old grey donkey, Eeyore stood by himself in a thistly corner of the Forest, his front feet well apart, his head on one side, and thought about things. Sometimes he thought sadly to himself, "Why?" and sometimes he thought, "Wherefore?" and sometimes he thought, "Inasmuch as which?" and sometimes he didn't quite know what he was thinking about.

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